Ring the bell and you no longer have to do the runs, the obstacle course, the PT — and you no longer have to endure the hardships of training. Admiral McRaven is the author of three books: Spec Ops, Make Your Bed—based on the famous speech he gave at the University of Texas—and Sea Stories, … Admiral William H McRaven at University of Texas at Austin 2014. To me basic SEAL training was a lifetime of challenges crammed into six months. To the graduating class of 2014, you are moments away from graduating. A circus was two hours of additional calisthenics designed to wear you down, to break your spirit, to force you to quit. So, here are lessons I learned from basic SEAL training that hopefully will be of value to you as you move forward in life. Sometimes no matter how well you prepare or how well you perform you still end up as a sugar cookie. Naval Admiral William H. McRaven delivers an amazing University of Texas at Austin 2014 Commencement Address. Teofilo gallardo, formerly a regional director of the idea of interpersonal explicitness as asserted fact encyclo- resources, interruptions, agreements paedic information e. G. admiral mcraven speech , mcdon- alds. Here is the full transcript of Admiral William H. McRaven’s inspiring 2014 commencement address at University of Texas at Austin. If you want to change the world, start off by making your bed. The emotions are real you guys. Well, thank you president Powers, Provost Fenves, deans, members of the faculty, family and friends, and most importantly, the class of 2014, it is indeed an honor for me to be here … In between was a 200-foot-long rope. Just ring the bell. The instructors assure you, however, that no student has ever been eaten by a shark–at least not recently. To be successful in your mission, you have to swim under the ship and find the keel–the centerline and the deepest part of the ship. “If you want to change the world, start off by making your bed,” retired U.S. Navy Admiral William McRaven said in a commencement speech at the University of Texas, Austin. The steel structure of the ship blocks the moonlight, it blocks the surrounding street lamps, it blocks all ambient light. There are a lot of sharks in the world. If you did it right, the corners would be square, the covers pulled tight, the pillow centered just under the headboard and the extra blanket folded neatly at the foot of the rack — that’s Navy talk for bed. 1. It was a simple task — mundane at best. McRaven is a recognized authority on U.S. foreign policy who advised presidents George W. Bush and Barack Obama on defense issues. If you want to change the world don’t ever, ever ring the bell. Your hat had to be perfectly starched, your uniform immaculately pressed and your belt buckle shiny and void of any smudges. It is comforting to know that there is open water above you. It is comforting to know that there is open water above you. But somehow these little guys, from every corner of the nation and the world, always had the last laugh–swimming faster than everyone and reaching the shore long before the rest of us. 2. At times it will test you to your very core. If you can't do the little things right, you will never do the big things right. Admiral McRaven’s commencement speech is perhaps one of the best commencement speeches I have ever heard. AP Photo/The University of Texas at Austin, Marsha Miller U.S. Navy admiral … To pass SEAL training, there are a series of long swims that must be completed. McRaven oversaw the 2011 Navy SEAL raid in Pakistan that killed al-Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden. We practiced this technique extensively during basic training. US Navy Admiral, William H. McRaven, delivers a speech about the importance of doing the little things like making your bed, embracing the fears of life, and changing the world for generations to come. By the end of the day, that one task completed will have turned into many tasks completed. It’s been almost 37 years to the day that I graduated from UT. You can be sure that our custom-written papers are original and properly cited. But of all the things I remember, I don’t have a clue who the commencement speaker was that evening, and I certainly don’t remember anything they said. And, if by chance you have a miserable day, you will come home to a bed that is made — that you made — and a made bed gives you encouragement that tomorrow will be better. Every paddle must be synchronized to the stroke count of the coxswain. If you want to change the world, start off by making your bed. Everyone must exert equal effort or the boat will turn against the wave and be unceremoniously tossed back on the beach. We practiced this technique extensively during basic training. At least twice a week, the trainees were required to run the obstacle course. In the winter, the surf off San Diego can get to be 8 to 10 feet high and it is exceedingly difficult to paddle through the plunging surf unless everyone digs in. But, you are also taught that if a shark begins to circle your position, stand your ground. To be successful in your mission, you have to swim under the ship and find the keel — the centerline and the deepest part of the ship. If you want to change the world, find someone to help you paddle. Well, I am confident that it will look much, much better, but if you will humor this old sailor for just a moment, I have a few suggestions that may help you on your way to a better a world. Ring the bell and you no longer have to do the runs, the obstacle course, the PT–and you no longer have to endure the hardships of training. Instead of swinging his body underneath the rope and inching his way down, he bravely mounted the TOP of the rope and thrust himself forward. But somehow these little guys, from every corner of the nation and the world, always had the last laugh — swimming faster than everyone and reaching the shore long before the rest of us. He has commanded at every level in the ranks, from trainee to a four-star naval admiral through his distinguished level of service. It matters not your gender, your ethnic or religious background, your orientation or your social status. Admiral McRaven: [This university’s] slogan is, "What starts here changes the world." It will be painful. But every morning we were required to make our bed to perfection. But, if every one of you changed the lives of just 10 people — and each one of those folks changed the lives of another 10 people — just 10 — then in five generations — 125 years — the class of 2014 will have changed the lives of 800 million people. Well, I am confident that it will look much, much better. Our seasoned business, internet blogging, and social media writers are true professionals with vast experience at turning words Graduation Speech Admiral Mcraven into action.Graduation Speech Admiral Mcraven Short deadlines are no problem for any business plans, white papers, email marketing campaigns, and original, compelling web content. Basic SEAL training is six months of long torturous runs in the soft sand, midnight swims in the cold water off San Diego, obstacles courses, unending calisthenics, days without sleep and always being cold, wet and miserable. William H. McRaven in his commencement address at the University of Texas, Austin 2014. Several times a week, the instructors would line up the class and do a uniform inspection. If you can’t do the little things right, you will never do the big things right. But, if you think about it, not only were these soldiers saved by the decisions of one person, but their children yet unborn were also saved. You were never going to succeed. And, if by chance you have a miserable day, you will come home to a bed that is made — that you made — and a made bed gives you encouragement that tomorrow will be better. Listen to the MP3 Audio: Admiral William H. McRaven’s 2014 Commencement Address at University of Texas at Austin. Phone: (512) 471-3151, Desalination Breakthrough Could Lead to Cheaper Water Filtration, View 10 Life Lessons from Admiral McRaven. Well, thank you. It was exceptionally thorough. Every paddle must be synchronized to the stroke count of the coxswain. Do not act afraid. Building on the core tenets laid out in his speech, McRaven now recounts tales from his own life and from those of people he encountered during his military service who dealt with hardship and made tough decisions with determination, compassion, honor, and courage. The instructors told us we could leave the mud if only five men would quit–just five men and we could get out of the oppressive cold. The pain of the circuses built inner strength–built physical resiliency. One is the night swim. But who cares right? On May 17, Adm. McRaven delivered the commencement address at his alma mater, University of Texas at Austin.Here are his remarks in full. To the Editor: Re “We’re Under Attack From the President,” by William H. McRaven, a retired Navy admiral (Op-Ed, Oct. 18): The poignant article by Admiral McRaven… Every day during training you were challenged with multiple physical events — long runs, long swims, obstacle courses, hours of calisthenics — something designed to test your mettle. The ship-attack mission is where a pair of SEAL divers is dropped off outside an enemy harbor and then swims well over 2 miles–underwater–using nothing but a depth gauge and a compass to get to their target. McRaven is a recognized authority on U.S. foreign policy who advised presidents George W. Bush and Barack Obama on defense issues. So, acknowledging that fact, if I can’t make this commencement speech memorable, I will at least try to make it short. If you want to change the world don’t ever, ever ring the bell. A circus meant that for that day you didn’t measure up. Your hat had to be perfectly starched, your uniform immaculately pressed and your belt buckle shiny and void of any smudges. And if the shark, hungry for a midnight snack, darts towards you, then summon up all your strength and punch him in the snout and he will turn and swim away. Admiral William H. McRaven, a retired U.S. Navy four-star admiral and the former chancellor of the University of Texas system, will deliver the address at MIT’s 2020 Commencement exercises on Friday, May 29. Over a few weeks of difficult training my SEAL class, which started with 150 men, was down to just 35. In this category, you can read and download all speeches in a PDF and MP3 format. In his speech, Admiral William H. McRaven uses words like “Vietnam veterans,” and “calisthenics” to save himself from giving details about his instructors and the exercises he was made to do during the training. Long runs, long swims, obstacle courses, hours of calisthenics–something designed to test your mettle. I remember a lot of things about that day. You had to climb the three-tiered tower and once at the top, you grabbed the rope, swung underneath the rope and pulled yourself hand over hand until you got to the other end. If you want to change the world sometimes you have to slide down the obstacle head-first. Those students didn’t make it through training. Read the following excerpts of a graduation speech made by Naval Adm. William H. McRaven at the University of Texas in 2014. Admiral William McRaven is a retired U.S. Navy four-star Admiral. Basic SEAL training is six months of long, torturous runs in the soft sand, midnight swims in the cold water off San Diego, obstacle courses, unending calisthenics, days without sleep and always being cold, wet and miserable. But it all began when I left UT for Basic SEAL training in Coronado, California. UT alum Adm. William H. McRaven gives students the "hook 'em horns" at the university's commencement last week. Well, Admiral McRaven has served the nation for thirty-three years as a Navy SEAL. If you can’t do the little things right, you will never do the big things right. If you want to change the world, start off by making your bed. During SEAL training the students are broken down into boat crews. The big men in the other boat crews would always make good-natured fun of the tiny little flippers the munchkins put on their tiny little feet prior to every swim. During the land warfare phase of training, the students are flown out to San Clemente Island which lies off the coast of San Diego. But, you are also taught that if a shark begins to circle your position — stand your ground. I was in the boat with the tall guys, but the best boat crew we had was made up of the little guys–the munchkin crew we called them. Failure could mean injury and being dropped from the training. And while these lessons were learned during my time in the military, I can assure you that it matters not whether you ever served a day in uniform. 10. Naval Adm. William H. McRaven, ninth commander of U.S. Special Operations Command, delivered a memorable speech at the University-wide Commencement on May 17. I remember I had throbbing headache from a party the night before. It was still over eight hours till the sun came up–eight more hours of bone-chilling cold. Admiral McRaven … It is on Wednesday of Hell Week that you paddle down to the mud flats and spend the next 15 hours trying to survive the freezing cold mud, the howling wind and the incessant pressure to quit from the instructors. Do not swim away. Please let us know if you're having issues with commenting. Every day your boat crew forms up on the beach and is instructed to get through the surfzone and paddle several miles down the coast. During SEAL training the students are … If you want to change the world, measure a person by the size of their heart, not the size of their flippers. If you want to change the world, find someone to help you paddle. But start each day with a task completed. 6. You will fail. Adm. William H. McRaven, commander of U.S. Special Operations Command, gave a commencement address last week that graduates, and their parents, won't soon forget. So, here are the 10 lessons I learned from basic SEAL training that hopefully will be of value to you as you move forward in life. Admiral McRaven … No one was over about 5-foot-5. 5. If you can't do the little things right, you will never do the big things right. The ninth week of SEAL training is referred to as Hell Week. During SEAL training the students are broken down into boat crews. Find someone to help you through life. The instructors told us we could leave the mud if only five men would quit — just five men — and we could get out of the oppressive cold. The munchkin boat crew had one American Indian, one African-American, one Polish-American, one Greek-American, one Italian-American and two tough kids from the Midwest. At times it will test you to your very core. As chancellor, he oversaw 14 institutions that educate 221,000 students and employ 20,000 faculty and more than 80,000 health care professionals, researchers and staff. If you think it’s hard to change the lives of 10 people, change their lives forever, you’re wrong. I have been a Navy SEAL for 36 years. I have been a Navy SEAL for 36 years. The pain of the circuses built inner strength, built physical resiliency. Do not act afraid. Our struggles in this world are similar and the lessons to overcome those struggles and to move forward–changing ourselves and the world around us–will apply equally to all. If you failed to meet those standards your name was posted on a list, and at the end of the day those on the list were invited to a “circus.” A circus was two hours of additional calisthenics designed to wear you down, to break your spirit, to force you to quit. Brett McKay: We’ll do fine. Every day, your boat crew forms up on the beach and is instructed to get through the surfzone and paddle several miles down the coast. Go one more generation and you can change the entire population of the world — eight billion people. You had to climb the three-tiered tower and, once at the top, you grabbed the rope, swung underneath the rope and pulled yourself hand over hand until you got to the other end. As the sun began to set that Wednesday evening, my training class, having committed some “egregious infraction of the rules” was ordered into the mud. You can’t change the world alone–you will need some help–and to truly get from your starting point to your destination takes friends, colleagues, the goodwill of strangers and a strong coxswain to guide them. Answer the questions that follow. The song was terribly out of tune, but sung with great enthusiasm. But at some time during SEAL training, everyone–everyone–made the circus list. The University’s slogan is, “What starts here changes the world.” I have to admit — I kinda like it. Moments away from starting to change the world–for the better. An inspiring and powerful 20-minute commencement speech by Naval Admiral William H. McRaven, ninth commander of U.S. Special Operations Command, at the University-wide Commencement at The University of Texas at Austin on May 17, 2014. For failing the uniform inspection, the student had to run, fully clothed, into the surfzone and then, wet from head to toe, roll around on the beach until every part of your body was covered with sand. Watch and read our English Speeches. He is a Navy admiral and former commander of SEAL Team 3, acclaimed for leading the mission to find Osama bin Laden. As the sun began to set that Wednesday evening, my training class, having committed some “egregious infraction of the rules” was ordered into the mud. It was a simple task, mundane at best. For failing the uniform inspection, the student had to run, fully clothed into the surfzone and then, wet from head to toe, roll around on the beach until every part of your body was covered with sand. The steel structure of the ship blocks the moonlight, it blocks the surrounding street lamps, it blocks all ambient light. On May 17, Adm. McRaven delivered the commencement address at his alma mater, University of Texas at Austin.Here are his remarks in full. There were many students who just couldn’t accept the fact that all their effort was in vain. If you want to change the world, start off by making your bed. Journalism naval admiral william h. mcraven If you can’t do the little things right, you will never do the big things right. Building on the core tenets laid out in his speech, McRaven now recounts tales from his own life and from those of people he encountered during his military service who dealt with hardship and made tough decisions with determination, compassion, honor, and courage. Ring the bell and you no longer have to wake up at 5 o’clock. It is six months of being constantly harrassed by professionally trained warriors who seek to find the weak of mind and body and eliminate them from ever becoming a Navy SEAL. The chattering teeth and shivering moans of the trainees were so loud it was hard to hear anything.